Author:

Sarah Mahoney

Sarah Mahoney is a freelance journalist who writes about health and wellness and is a contributing editor f AARP The Magazine. Her work appears regularly in such publications as Weight Watchers Magazine and Marketing Daily, and she’s been published in Self, Glamour, Good Housekeeping, Prevention and Reuters. Based in Midcoast Maine, she’s an avid hiker and explorer.

Posts from Sarah Mahoney

Patient Story

‘The best feeling in the world’

Advanced brain-mapping technology and brain surgery give a Michigan boy, 6, hope for a life without seizures.

Patient Story

‘It was urgent’

Jim Boismier wasn't especially worried when he underwent heart tests at a care campus near home. But then his doctor identified an obstructed artery.

When work hurts

Learn to recognize overuse and repetitive motion injuries—before they become chronic.

Trouble on third shift?

Millions of Americans work overnight. The right strategies for sleep, nutrition and exercise can make it easier—and healthier.

Patient Story

‘Eyes on the prize’

Debilitating pain put a damper on Bryan Marquardt's cherished trips to the ice rink. After outpatient hip surgery, he's back in the game.

Patient Story

‘I changed everything, cold turkey’

After a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes, Alan Barchett's commitment to diet and lifestyle change has helped him reclaim his health.

‘We can all play a role’

Sometimes, a simple question is the best way to begin connecting with someone who may struggle with thoughts of suicide: 'Are you OK?'

Patient Story

‘A prosperous, blessed life’

For Trevor Freeman, 16, a lifelong battle with sickle cell disease hasn't stymied his ambitions for golf glory.

Sleep darker

Eager for restful nights? Aim to keep TV, smartphones and electronics out of the bedroom.

7 steps to a healthier heart

A cardiologist identifies good habits to adopt—and one very bad habit to drop.

Gardening for good health

Follow these smart steps to get the most from your happy place.

Patient Story

‘One true cardiac emergency’

After a 10-hour surgery to repair arterial and heart damage, a vintage tank enthusiast is back on track.